3, September, 2013
SPOTLIGHT ON KNOWLEDGE

Spotlight on Publications: Gender-Responsive Budgeting

In recent years, governments worldwide have been implementing gender-responsive budgeting (GRB) to contribute to the advancement of gender equality and the fulfillment of women’s rights. This Spotlight highlights key publications on GRB, focusing particularly on Latin American experiences.

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UNIFEM’s Work on Gender-Responsive Budgeting: Overview

This report provides an evaluation of the work of the United Nations Development Fund for Women (UNIFEM) on Gender Responsive Budgeting (GRB) between 1997 and 2009. It analyses the role played by UNIFEM, currently UN-Women, in the promotion of approaches to and strategies for GRB internationally and identifies examples of best practice, with a particular focus on Egypt, Nigeria and Latin America (Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, Ecuador, Honduras, Peru, Uruguay and Venezuela) where strong and independent approaches to GRB have been developed, providing useful experiences in local level budgetary analysis and participatory exercises. The report acknowledges the importance of finding appropriate ways to implement GRB in different contexts as well as the need for GRB approaches to focus on both civil society and government partners.
 
Full citation: UNIFEM.2010. UNIFEM’s Work on Gender-Responsive Budgeting: Overview. UNIFEM, New York.
 

Integrating Gender Responsive Budgeting into the Aid Effectiveness Agenda: Country Summaries

This publication is a summary of research conducted under the UNIFEM and European Commission programme ‘Integrating Gender Responsive Budgeting into the Aid Effectiveness Agenda’, implemented in Cameroon, Ethiopia, India, Morocco, Nepal, Mozambique, Peru, Rwanda, Tanzania and Uganda. The report outlines the main findings of the investigation into how GRB tools have been used in budgeting frameworks and processes in these countries and sheds light on best practices, such as the Sasieta Law in Peru, as well as areas where GRB should be strengthened. This evaluation report will be useful for understanding how GRB has been integrated into government budgeting in different contexts in the global South.
 
Full citation: Roeder, M., Takayama, C., Fuertes, P. and Hurtado, I. 2009. Integrating Gender Responsive Budgeting into the Aid Effectiveness Agenda: Country Summaries. UNIFEM, New York.
 

Gender Responsive Budgeting and Women’s Reproductive Rights: A Resource Pack

This resource pack provides an overview of different tools and strategies for understanding and implementing GRB with a focus on reproductive health, HIV and violence against women. The pack provides information on how to incorporate a gender perspective into budgeting processes in different development situations. The pack comes in the form of short “sheets” organised into sub-topics, including references for further reading. It also provides access to information on a wide range of issues and examples related to GRB in many Latin American countries such as Bolivia, Brazil, Ecuador, Mexico and Peru. This pack is intended for direct use by practitioners and decision makers in developing countries.
 
Full citation: UNIFEM and UNFPA. 2006. Gender Responsive Budgeting and Women’s Reproductive Rights: A Resource Pack. UNIFEM/UNFPA, New York.
 

What Can We Expect from Gender Sensitive Budgets? Strategies in Brazil and in Chile in a Comparative Perspective

In this paper, the author makes a comparative analysis of Brazilian and Chilean experiences with GRB in order to understand how gender sensitive budgets can contribute to women’s rights and good governance. Chile’s experience is cited as an example of good practice at institutional and policy levels, while the Brazilian experience shows how the organisational and participative capacity of civil society has helped get GRB onto the public agenda and drive reforms. Finally, the paper draws some conclusions on the role of GRB in broader development processes.
 
Full citation: Raes, F. 2006. What Can We Expect from Gender Sensitive Budgets? Strategies in Brazil and in Chile in a Comparative Perspective. UNIFEM, New York.
 

Gender-Sensitive Budgets in Latin America: Accountability for Equity and Transparency

This publication is a compilation of six different papers on gender-sensitive budgets implemented in the Andean countries of Bolivia, Ecuador and Peru through the UNIFEM programme ‘Andean Women’s Economic and Social Rights’. One of the core aims of the programme was to promote women’s participation in budgets. The papers describe how government reforms have expanded citizen involvement in budgeting, leading to several interesting innovations. Despite this, there is an on-going discrepancy between political discourse and documentation on GRB and the actual implementation of gender-sensitive budgeting initiatives, which suffer from a lack of sufficient budget allocation and technical expertise for implementation. This paper will be useful for governments and civil society interested in learning about different tools and strategies for GRB.
 
Full citation: Andía-Pérez, B. and Beltrán-Barco, A. 2004. Gender-Sensitive Budgets in Latin America: Accountability for Equity and Transparency. UNIFEM, Quito.
 

The Missing Link: Applied Budget Work as a Tool to Hold Governments Accountable for Maternal Mortality Reduction Commitments

This brief analyses the linkages that exist between maternal mortality and budget allocation and expenditure, as well as the potential of civil society to hold governments accountable for their commitments to reducing maternal mortality rates. It also presents case studies and lessons learned by Fundar in Mexico, Women’s Dignity in Tanzania and the Center for Budget and Governance Accountability in India. The brief shows that although resources are being allocated to GRB, they are not necessarily being allocated correctly or spent effectively. The brief will be useful for researchers, practitioners and policymakers in developing countries where governments have made commitments to reducing maternal mortality and morbidity rates.
 
Full citation: Hofbauer, H. and Garza, M. 2009. The Missing Link: Applied Budget Work as a Tool to Hold Governments Accountable for Maternal Mortality Reduction Commitments. International Budget Partnership and the International Initiative on Maternal Mortality and Human Rights, United States.
 

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